Ports - Invest in Cumbria

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Ports in and near to Cumbria

Cumbria has a high density of ports along its coast line providing access to worldwide trade routes

The Port of Workington is the largest port on Cumbria, handling 600,000 tonnes of cargo and around 300 ship movements each year. Owned and operated by Cumbria County Council, the port has secured £5.7m to establish a major container handling facility.

Port of Barrow has considerable experience in handling specialist cargoes as well as a range of bulk aggregates. It is owned and operated by Associated British Ports, who also own the Port of Silloth, which specialises in argribulks such as animal feed.

Smaller ports can be found at Maryport and Whitehaven, focused mainly on serving the fishing and leisure and tourism sectors, while the Port of Millom is currently advancing plans to extend the services it provides to the business, leisure, tourism, energy and environment sectors.

Ports
Port of Heysham

Port of Heysham

Heysham Port is the 24 HOUR gateway offering easy round-the-clock access for Irish Sea ferries, a diverse range of general cargo services and the response-time sensitive offshore gas supply industry.

Ports
Port of Barrow

Port of Barrow

Centrally located on the West Coast of the UK, Barrow has worldwide trading links. The port has considerable experience in handling specialist cargoes as well as a range of bulk aggregates. It is also an ideal base for offshore and renewable-energy projects located in the Irish Sea, and has become the import hub for Kimberly Clark's woodpulp products.

Barrow is known as the 'Gateway to the Lake District', and is a welcoming port of call for 'round-Britain' cruises.

Ports
Whitehaven Marina

Whitehaven Marina

Whitehaven Marina is the most comprehensive marina on the north west coast of England; a safe harbour with 285 fully serviced marina berths and extensive quay wall berth areas for larger boats.

Access to the marina is available at almost all states of the tide and the boatyard services include boat lifting, hard standing and under cover boat storage.

Ports
Port of Workington

Port of Workington

The Port of Workington is the largest port in Cumbria and one of the main hubs in the North West. It serves the region's industry and agriculture, including most of the major manufacturing and processing businesses in the area.

Workington handles 600,000 tonnes of cargo and around 300 ship movements each year. The port has room for expansion and has been diversifying into new operations since the emergence of the Britain's Energy Coast initiative. It recently secured £5.7m to establish a major container handling facility, which will significantly improve links to international markets.

Ports
Maryport Harbour

Maryport Harbour

Maryport harbour was developed around a fishing creek at the mouth of the River Ellen in the nineteenth century. The harbour prospered mainly due to the export of coal to Ireland, and exports of steel rails, bar bolts and cast iron from the Solway Iron Works. Shipbuilders' yards were also a common sight around Maryport. In recent years the business of the port has focused on serving the local fishing industry and on a growing leisure and tourism market, helped by significant investment to improve the marina.

Ports
Port of Silloth

Port of Silloth

The Port of Silloth has seen steady growth in tonnage levels over recent years. Located on the English side of the Solway Firth, many of the port's customers trade with Western Europe. Silloth's principal trade is agribulks and the port is the North-West base for the operations of Prime Molasses - a major UK supplier of molasses to the animal-feed industry.

The port plays an integral role in the Cumbrian and regional economy and is a catalyst for local trade and commerce.

Ports
Port of Millom

Port of Millom

On the fringe of the Lake District National Park, Port Millom offers a direct gateway to the stunning western and southern lakes and fells, as well as the Irish Sea coast and the Isle of Man.

Privately-owned and in operation for many years, the port currently focuses on serving the transport, storage, tourism and energy sectors. It also provides a number of marine services to commerce and industry in the Northwest of England.