Architecture

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Cumbrian architecture

Cumbria is home to some stunning historic architecture.

Please us the map to the left to find out more about some of the more notable sites in Cumbria.

Architecture
Carlisle Castle

Carlisle Castle

Near the ruins of Hadrian's Wall the castle is over 900 years old and has been the scene of many historical episodes in British history. Given the proximity of Carlisle to the border between England and Scotland, it has been the centre of many wars and invasions. Today the castle is managed by English Heritage and is open to the public. The castle until recently was the administrative headquarters of the former King's Own Royal Border Regiment now county headquarters to the Duke of Lancaster's Regiment and a museum to the regiment is within the castle walls.

Architecture
Furness Abbey

Furness Abbey

Furness Abbey is a former Cistercian monastery situated on the outskirts of the English town of Barrow-in-Furness, Cumbria. The abbey dates back to 1123 and was once the second wealthiest and most powerful monastery in the country, behind only Fountains Abbey in North Yorkshire.

Architecture
Dalton Castle

Dalton Castle

Dalton Castle is a 14th-century peel tower situated in Dalton-in-Furness, Cumbria, England, and in the ownership of the National Trust. It was constructed by the monks of Furness Abbey for the protection of the nearby market town, and was the building from which the Abbot administered the area and dispensed justice.

Architecture
Muncaster Castle

Muncaster Castle

Muncaster is located in the heart of the Western Lake District and, uniquely, is in the only coastal village of the Lake District National Park, Ravenglass.

Architecture
Levens Hall

Levens Hall

The first dwelling at Levens was a medieval pele tower, built by the de Redman family of Yealand Redmayne. The Bellingham family, who were wealthy landowners, chose Levens as their main residence in the 1590s and incorporated the fortified tower into a gentleman's residence. The stately home is now world renowned for its gardens and the grounds are a venue to all manner of festivals including the Lakes chilli fest.

Architecture
Holker Castle

Holker Castle

Holker Hall is a country house with a celebrated garden situated on the Cartmel Peninsula. Before the Dissolution of the Monasteries in 1536 the land on which Holker stands belonged to Cartmel Priory.

Architecture
Carlisle Cathedral

Carlisle Cathedral

The Cathedral Church of the Holy and Undivided Trinity, otherwise called Carlisle Cathedral, is the seat of the Anglican Bishop of Carlisle. It was founded as an Augustinian monastery and became a cathedral in 1133.

Architecture
Cartmel Priory

Cartmel Priory

is a priory founded in 1190 by William Marshal, later 1st Earl of Pembroke for the Augustinian Canons and dedicated to Saint Mary the Virgin and Saint Michael. It was first colonised by a Prior and twelve monks from Bradenstoke Priory in Wiltshire.

Architecture
Shap Abbey

Shap Abbey

was a monastic religious house of the Premonstratensian order on the western bank of the River Lowther in the civil parish of Shap Rural, around 1.5 miles (2.4 km) from the village of Shap, in the Eden District of Cumbria. The site is in the care of English Heritage and managed on its behalf by the Lake District National Park.

Architecture
Calder Abbey

Calder Abbey

At the Dissolution Henry VIII gave the abbey to Sir Thomas Leigh, who pulled off the roof and sold it and anything else he could and reduced the church to a ruin. Ownership passed through many secular hands, in which it still remains.

Much of the cloister buildings remain either incorporated into Calder Abbey House, now a largely early-nineteenth century structure that is still a private residence, or in adjoining ruins, such as the chapter house.

Architecture
Holme Cultram Abbey

Holme Cultram Abbey

Holme Cultram Abbey was a Cistercian monastery founded in 1150 in what is now the village of Abbeytown but at the time of foundation was in territory in the possession of David I of Scotland, who together with his son, Henry, founded it in 1150. The mother-house was Melrose Abbey, of the filiation of Cīteaux.

Architecture
St Bees Priory

St Bees Priory

St Bees Priory is the parish church of St Bees. The Benedictine Priory was founded by William le Meschin, Lord of Egremont on an earlier religious site, and was dedicated by Archbishop Thurstan of York sometime between 1120 and 1135. The Priory was dissolved in 1539, and since then has been the parish church of St Bees.

Architecture
Isel Hall

Isel Hall

Isel Hall is an Elizabethan Range with a fortified Pele Tower, dominating the landscape in its setting above the River Derwent. Standing on a steep slope above the winding River Derwent and two miles from Bassenthwaite Lake, Isel Hall is a spectacular building.