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Why Cumbria?

Location

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Cumbria is the most beautiful and unique county in England; there is no better place to live, work, visit and invest.

Home to The Lake District, flanked by the Pennines and mile-upon-mile of stunning coastline, nowhere else in England boasts such a rich variety of inspirational and exhilarating landscapes.

Cumbria possesses the brains to match its outstanding natural beauty and has proudly positioned itself as a world-leader in the maritime, specialist manufacturing and nuclear industries, while making significant strides into new sectors, in particular renewable energy.

Connected by road (M6), rail (the West Coast Mainline and Cumbria Coast Line) and air (Carlisle Airport), England's second largest county is in a perfect location to reach national and international markets. This, along with a wide range of rural and urban opportunities and an unrivalled quality of life, combine to create the perfect place to mix business and pleasure.

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Overview

Cumbria has enjoyed a remarkably diverse railway history. Starting with locally promoted lines such as those from Carlisle to Newcastle and Maryport in the 1830s and 40s, these were soon linked into the first of the great trunk lines through the area, the Lancaster and Carlisle Railway and its northern partner, the Caledonian Railway.

Local lines proliferated round the coast serving the burgeoning coal and iron industries of West Cumberland and Furness, with the Furness Railway eventually dominating the scene in the south and west - and performing a vital role in the development of its home town, Barrow-in-Furness. Across the county ran the links from the Durham coal fields to West Cumberland and along the Pennines came the Settle & Carlisle line of the Midland Railway.

Please use the map on the left to find information on cumbria's closest airports.

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Carlisle

Carlisle railway station, also known as Carlisle Citadel station, is a railway station which serves the Cumbrian City of Carlisle, and is a major station on the West Coast Main Line, lying 102 miles (164 km) south of Glasgow Central, and 299 miles (481 km) north of London Euston. It is also the northern terminus of the celebrated Settle and Carlisle Line - notionally (and historically) a continuation of the Midland Main Line from Leeds, Sheffield and ultimately London St Pancras. It is a Grade II* listed building. Carlisle Railway station was used for the Homebase advert in 2010.

Carlisle Station

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Penrith

Penrith railway station is located on the West Coast Main Line in the United Kingdom. It serves the town of Penrith, Cumbria and is less than one mile from its centre. National Express coaches leave from the station's car park and there are bus links to Keswick, Workington. Appleby-in-Westmorland and Ullswater from here too.

Penrith Station

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Oxenholme The Lake District

The station is situated on the West Coast Main Line and is also the start of the Windermere Branch Line to Windermere. The station serves as a main line connection point for Kendal, and is managed by Virgin Trains. The word "the" is sometimes omitted from the station name.

Oxenholme has the distinction of being the only village station currently served by express trains on the West Coast Main Line, all the other stations on this route serving either towns or cities.

Oxenholme Station

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Kendal

The station is situated on the Windermere Branch Line from Oxenholme to Windermere. It is operated by First TransPennine Express. It only has one platform which has a stone-built shelter. It is unstaffed. It is served by one train per hour in each direction with some trains running direct to Manchester. Passengers for most other destinations must change at Oxenholme.

Kendal Station

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Burneside

The station is situated on the Windermere Branch Line from Oxenholme to Windermere. Burneside is a request stop. It only has one platform, although before the branch was reduced to single track it, like the other stations on the line, had two.

Burneside Station

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Staveley

The station is situated on the Windermere Branch Line from Oxenholme to Windermere. Staveley is a request stop.

Staveley Station

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Windermere

It is located just south of the A591, about fifteen minutes' walk or a short bus ride from the lake.It is the terminus of the former Kendal and Windermere Railway single-track Windermere Branch Line, with a single platform serving one terminal track.

The station was at one time bigger than this, with four platforms and an overall roof. Three tracks were taken out of use when the branch was reduced to a one-train operated single line in 1973 as an economy measure.

Windermere Station

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Lazonby and Kirkoswald

This station serves the villages of Lazonby and Kirkoswald in Cumbria, England. It is operated by Northern Rail who provide all passenger train services. It is situated in the centre of Lazonby and, like many other stations on the line, was closed on 4 May 1970 when local passenger services between Skipton & Carlisle were withdrawn. The platforms and buildings survived however, and following several years of use by Dalesrail excursions it was reopened on a full-time basis in July 1986.

Lazonby and Kirkoswald Station

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Langwathby

Langwathby railway station is a railway station which serves the village of Langwathby. It is operated by Northern Rail who provide all passenger train services. The station was built by the Midland Railway and opened in 1876. It closed when local stopping trains over the Settle-Carlisle Line were withdrawn in May 1970, but was reopened in July 1986.

Part of the station buildings have been converted into the popular Brief Encounter Tea Rooms.

Langwathby Station

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Appleby

Opened by the Midland Railway at the same time as the line itself in May 1876, it became part of the London, Midland and Scottish Railway during the Grouping of 1923. The station then passed to the London Midland Region of British Railways on nationalisation in 1948. It was one of only two stations on the Settle-Carlisle line to remain open (Settle being the other) following the withdrawal of local stopping trains in May 1970.

When Sectorisation was introduced in the 1980s, the station was served by Regional Railways until the Privatisation of British Railways.

Appleby Station

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Kirkby Stephen

The station is situated nearly a mile from the town at Midland Hill and was formerly known as Kirkby Stephen West because of the older Kirkby Stephen or Kirkby Stephen East station that was situated in the town and was on the North Eastern Railway's Stainmore and Eden Valley lines.

The station is served by seven trains to Carlisle each weekday and six trains to Leeds. Saturdays see an extra service towards Leeds, whilst there are three trains each way on Sundays. DalesRail services between Blackpool North/Preston and Carlisle also call at the station on Sundays during the summer.

Kirkby Stephen Station

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Garsdale

Adjoining the station are sixteen Railway Cottages built for its employees by the Midland Railway around 1876, the year the Settle-Carlisle Line opened. A further six cottages were added near to the Moorcock Inn soon afterwards. The station once boasted the highest water troughs in the world (just along the line at Ling Gill), and a waiting room where Anglican church services were held. Also Garsdale, in steam days, had a turntable with a wall of sleepers around it to prevent locomotives being spun by strong winds.

Garsdale Station

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Dent

Dent railway station serves the villages of Cowgill and Dent in Cumbria, England. It is operated by Northern Rail who provide all passenger train services.

Dent village is approximately four miles to the west, and 400 ft (122 m) below the height of the station, with Cowgill being the nearest village, around half a mile away.

At an altitude of 1,150 feet (351 metres) near Blea Moor Tunnel, Dent is the highest railway station on the National Rail network in England. Dent Station buildings are available to rent as holiday cottage accommodation

Dent Station

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Ribblehead

This station is now leased by the Settle and Carlisle Railway Trust who have completely restored and refurbished it. There are resident caretakers, a small shop selling memorabilia, and its Visitor Centre includes exhibits about the history of the line and the fight to keep it open. One exhibit in the Visitor Centre is the original station sign and a small exhibition about the Midland Railway company, builders of the line and originally the train operators.

Ribblehead Station

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Horton-in-Ribblesdale

In the 1950s and 60s under stationmaster Taylor, Horton won the Best Kept Station award for seventeen consecutive years. The station lost its passenger service on 4 May 1970, but reopened in July 1986, along with several other local stations on the line.

Horton-in-Ribblesdale Station

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Settle

The station dates from May 1876 and is staffed on a part-time basis. There are a range of facilities available in the main buildings on the southbound platform.

The old station signal box – which was abolished in 1984 – has been restored as a visitor attraction by the Friends of the Settle - Carlisle Line - it is located behind the southbound platform and is open to the public at certain times.

Settle Station

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Wetheral

The 1830's brought the railway age to Wetheral. The renowned Wetheral Railway Viaduct carries the Carlisle to Newcastle railway over the River Eden. It was constructed by Francis Giles between 1830 and 1834, and stands 100 feet high. It was one of the first railway viaducts to be built in this country. A footpath goes across the railway viaduct between Wetheral station and Great Corby.

Wetheral Station

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Brampton

The station is located about a mile south east of the town, near the village of Milton. Staff were removed from the station in 1967, with the main buildings demolished in stages during the 1970's. In former times a short branch line, known locally as 'The Dandy', ran from the station, then known as Brampton Junction, to Brampton Town railway station in the centre of of Brampton. This line closed in 1923 and most of the route is now a public footpath.

Brampton Station

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Dalston

The railway station is a request stop on part of the scenic Cumbrian Coast Line 6 kilometres (3.7 mi) south west of Carlisle

Dalston Station

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Wigton

The railway station is a stop on the scenic Cumbrian Coast Line 18 kilometres (11 mi) south east of Carlisle.

Wigton Station

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Aspatria

Opened by the Maryport and Carlisle Railway in 1841, the station was once the junction for a long-defunct branch line to Mealsgate. Passenger trains on this route began in 1866 but ceased in September 1930 and complete closure followed in 1952.

The station became part of the London, Midland and Scottish Railway during the Grouping of 1923, and then passed on to the London Midland Region of British Railways on nationalisation in 1948.

Aspatria Station

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Maryport

The station is somewhat unusual in that it consists of a single bi-directional platform rather than the usual two side platforms used elsewhere on the double track sections of the Cumbrian Coast line. Southbound trains have to cross over to the northbound line to reach the platform before returning to the correct line south of the station. This can cause delays if two trains are scheduled to call in quick succession or if one or more trains are running late.

Maryport Station

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Flimby

The railway station is a request stop on the scenic Cumbrian Coast Line 47 kilometres (29 mi) south east of Carlisle railway station.

There is generally an hourly service northbound to Carlisle and southbound to Whitehaven railway station with some trains going onwards to Barrow-in-Furness railway station. On Sundays three trains a day go Carlisle and Whitehaven. All of these trains only stop at Flimby on request.

Flimby Station

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Workington

The present station is the second one to occupy the site. The first one was built at the opening of the original line and replaced by the London & North Western Railway who took over the Whitehaven Junction and Workington & Cockermouth lines in 1866. The Workington station in its present form was first known as Workington LNWR then at the grouping it was renamed Workington Main. With the end of steam the station then was referred to as 'Workington' railway station.

Workington Station

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Harrington

The railway station is a request stop on the scenic Cumbrian Coast Line 56 kilometres (35 mi) south east of Carlisle.

Harrington Station

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Parton

The railway station is a stop on the scenic Cumbrian Coast Line 61 kilometres (38 mi) south east of Carlisle. Immediately north and south of Parton, the line runs almost on the seashore, at the foot of cliffs which require supervision and occasional stabilisation to prevent landslides; sea erosion is also a danger, and 10MPH speed restrictions are in force over much of the section between here and Harrington, which is restricted to a single line. There is a signal box immediately to the north of the station.

Parton Station

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Whitehaven

The station formerly had four operational platforms, but today only two remain in use. The double line from Parton becomes single opposite the station signal box (which still bears the original station name Whitehaven Bransty) and then splits into two. Trains heading south must collect a token for the single line section to St Bees from a machine on the platform (with permission from the signaller) before they can proceed. Conversely trains from Barrow must surrender the token upon arrival, the driver returning it to the machine before departing for Workington. Only then can the signaller allow another train to enter the single line section.

Whitehaven Station

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St Bees

The railway station is a stop on part of the scenic Cumbrian Coast Line 70 kilometres (43 mi) south-west of Carlisle. It is the location of the only passing loop on the otherwise single track section between Whitehaven and Sellafield and trains are sometimes scheduled to pass here. The station still has a signal box, and there is a car park adjacent in the old goods yard. The station is situated only 200 yards from the centre of the village, and there are three pubs within easy walking distance; one, the Albert, formerly being noted for having warning of the approaching trains rung through from the signal box in the evening.

St Bees Station

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Sellafield

The serves the nuclear facility of Sellafield in Cumbria, England. The railway station is a stop on the scenic Cumbrian Coast Line. Some through trains to the Furness Line stop here.

The station (which dates from 1850) is a busy freight location, as much of the nuclear waste for Sellafield's Thorp nuclear fuel reprocessing plant is carried by train here from the docks in Barrow-in-Furness or from rail-connected nuclear power stations elsewhere in the UK.

Sellafield Station

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Seascale

The railway is dual-track as it passes through Seascale. The railway at Seascale passes over three bridges (two paths; one road) and underneath one (footbridge). The views are of St Bees Head and Scotland (to the north), Seascale village (to the east and south) and the Isle of Man (to the west). There are train shelters and seating but this is not a staffed station. Freight trains often pass through either going to or coming from Sellafield.

Seascale Station

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Drigg

The railway station is a request stop on the scenic Cumbrian Coast Line 24 kilometres (15 mi) south of Whitehaven. Some through trains to the Furness Line stop here.

Drigg Station

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Ravenglass

This station has two platforms, one serving trains travelling towards Barrow-in-Furness and one for trains travelling towards Carlisle. All former station buildings on the National Rail site, which is now unstaffed, are currently owned by the Eskdale Railway company, the main building being a pub, The Ratty Arms, the old southbound shelter a museum (leaving only small shelters for mainline travellers) and the goods shed an engineering workshop. Through tickets from trains on the Cumbria Coast Line are available to the Ravenglass and Eskdale Railway.

Ravenglass Station

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Bootle

Bootle Station serves the village of Bootle and the neighbouring hamlet of Hycemoor in Cumbria, England. The railway station is a request stop on the scenic Cumbrian Coast Line 39 kilometres (24 mi) north of Barrow-in-Furness. It is operated by Northern Rail who provide all passenger train services.

Bootle Station

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Silecroft

The railway station is a request stop on the scenic Cumbrian Coast Line 31 kilometres (19 mi) north east of Barrow-in-Furness. Some through trains to the Furness Line stop here.

Silecroft Station

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Millom

The railway station is a stop on the scenic Cumbrian Coast Line 26 kilometres (16 mi) north of Barrow-in-Furness.

It was opened by the Whitehaven & Furness Junction Railway in 1850.

The station buildings also house Millom Folk Museum and a small workshop offering furniture restoration.

Millom Station

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Green Road

Green Road railway station serves The Green, in Cumbria, England, a village some 3 miles (5 km) north of Millom and the rural parish of Millom Without. The railway station is a request stop on the scenic Cumbrian Coast Line north of Barrow-in-Furness.

Green Road has been adopted since 1981 and is a member of Northern Rail's Station Adoption scheme. The station has won a number of awards for its gardens.

Green Road Station

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Foxfield

The station dates from 1848, when the Furness Railway extended its line from Barrow to Kirkby-in-Furness to nearby Broughton-in-Furness with the intention of serving local copper mines. It was opened on 1 August 1848 and consisted of an island platform 13 feet 6 inches (4.11 m) long. Its west face was enclosed in a passenger shed 100 feet (30 m) long. There was also a goods shed 70 feet (21 m) long, and a very small booking office at the north end of the platform.

Foxfield Station

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Kirkby-in-Furness

The name Kirkby-in-Furness did not exist until the creation of the railway line. The village in fact is an amalgamation of six smaller villages/hamlets. The name Kirkby was chosen almost at random by the train company for the station and was eventually used for the collection of villages. In Victorian times it gained some fame as the station with the longest platform seat in the country. This though was removed many years ago.

Kirkby-in-Furness Station

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Askam-in-Furness

The railway along the Cumbrian coast was completed over many years by numerous small firms, who often would refuse to work together. However, eventually 'Grouping' forced the companies to work together on the railway, instead of constantly competing. Further problems were encountered when the people building the railway ran out of money, and so the proposed Duddon Viaduct, from Askam to Millom, was abandoned. Instead, a different route, going by way of Foxfield, was planned. This saved £37,000.

Askam-in-Furness Station

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Barrow-in-Furness

The present station was formerly known as Barrow Central and at one time it was a terminus for British Rail long-distance or InterCity services. From October 1947 until May 1983 these included sleeper services to and from London Euston. A sleeper service in the London direction only was briefly reintroduced between May 1987-May 1990.

Barrow-in-Furness Station

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Roose

Generally, only local services operated by Northern Rail stop at the station. However, a few longer-distances services operated by First TransPennine Express also use the station.

Roose Station

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Dalton

Generally, only local services operated by Northern Rail stop at the station. However, a few longer-distances services operated by First TransPennine Express also use the station.

Dalton Station

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Ulverston

It is primarily served by regional express services operated by TransPennine Express from Manchester Airport to Barrow-in-Furness. Additionally it is served by local services operated by Northern Rail from Lancaster to Barrow-in-Furness, with some continuing to Sellafield or Carlisle via the Cumbrian Coast Line. The current buildings are architecturally fine and date from 1873, when they were rebuilt as befitting one of the main stations of the Furness Railway. The clock tower and glass awnings, now extensively restored, are particularly fine.

Ulverston Station

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Cark and Cartmel

The station is architecturally interesting, with a main building (see image) erected by the Ulverston and Lancaster Railway in 1857. The station had a particular importance, as it serves Holker Hall, the home of Lord Cavendish of Furness formerly belonging to the Dukes of Devonshire. Special waiting rooms were provided for the dukes and their guests. The actual building retains many original features and is now a private residence. It extends to approximately one acre of gardens and woodland.

Cark and Cartmel Station

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Kents Bank

The station building was designed by the Lancaster architects Paley and Austin in 1865 for the Furness Railway.

Generally, services that are operated by Northern Rail mainly stop at this station. However, a few longer-distances services operated by First TransPennine Express also use the station.

Kents Bank Station

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Grange-over-Sands

The station is adjacent to the Grange-Over-Sands Promenade which (until the River Kent changed its course) ran along the edge of Morecambe Bay.

The station booking office is on the "up" (Lancaster) platform; the "down" Barrow) platform features a second-hand book-shop. There is step-less access to both platforms.

Grange-over-Sands Station

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Arnside

Opened in 1858 by the Ulverston and Lancaster Railway (a company backed by, and later taken over by the Furness Railway) (FR) in 1857, the station became part of the London, Midland and Scottish Railway during the Grouping of 1923. The station then passed on to the London Midland Region of British Railways on nationalisation in 1948.

Arnside Station

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Silverdale

Generally, only local services operated by Northern Rail stop at the station. However, a few longer-distances services operated by First TransPennine Express also use the station.

Silverdale Station

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Carnforth

Carnforth station was opened in 1846 by the Lancaster and Carlisle Railway Company (LCRC). It originally had a single platform and was a second-class station. It became a junction in 1857 when it was adjoined to the Ulverston and Lancaster Railway as its terminus. Soon afterwards, the Furness Railway began operating to Carnforth.

Carnforth Station

Why Cumbria

Airports

Cumbria has its own airport, Carlisle Airport, which is at present primarily a hub for freight and private flights.

Plans to develop the site have been ongoing since it was acquired by Stobart Group in 2009. The company aims to relocate the group headquarters to the airport site and bring the airport back to a standard that will enable commercial passenger flights to recommence. For more information on these development plans visit the Carlisle Airport website. A study detailing the economic impact of the proposed development can be found at the Useful Documents section of this site.

Cumbria is well served by some of Britain's busiest airports, which can cater for passenger and freight. Glasgow and Edinburgh airports can be reached in a couple of hours, Newcastle to the east and Blackpool, Manchester, Liverpool and Leeds to the south.

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Why Cumbria

Glasgow Airport

Glasgow Airport is located 8 miles (13 km) south west of Glasgow city centre, near the towns of Paisley and Renfrew in Renfrewshire.

In 2009 the airport handled 7,225,021 passengers, an 11.7% annual reduction, making it the second busiest in Scotland, after Edinburgh Airport, and the eighth busiest airport in the United Kingdom. It was the first airport in Scotland to handle over one million passengers in one month, in July 2004. The airport is owned and operated by BAA Airports Ltd

www.glasgowairport.com

Glasgow Airport

Why Cumbria

Edinburgh Airport

Passenger traffic at Edinburgh Airport has increased every year since 1997, except in 2008 when a slight drop was recorded. In 2009, a record 9,049,355 passengers used the airport with 115,969 aircraft movements recorded.

The airport is owned and operated by BAA Airports Ltd

www.edinburghairport.com

Edinburgh Airport

Why Cumbria

Newcastle Airport

The airport mainly serves Northumberland, Tyneside and Wearside. Passengers from Cumbria, North Yorkshire and southern Scotland also use the airport, the nearest similar sized airport being Leeds Bradford Airport to the south and the larger Edinburgh and Glasgow International airports to the north. In terms of passenger numbers, Newcastle is the third largest airport in the North of England, Manchester Airport being the largest and Liverpool Airport following.

www.newcastleairport.com

Newcastle Airport

Why Cumbria

Blackpool International Airport

In recent years the airport has been steadily expanding, accommodating helicopter operations for British Gas, and attracting scheduled flights from budget airlines, including Jet2.com, and also scheduled services by smaller operators to the Isle of Man.

Since World War II, the airport has also been a thriving centre for private, club and general aviation. Ryanair have since left the airport.

www.blackpoolinternational.com

Blackpool Airport

Why Cumbria

Manchester Airport

The airport provides regular direct flights to destinations worldwide by 84 airlines. North American carriers at Manchester include American Airlines, Continental Airlines, Delta Air Lines and US Airways.

The only UK operator serving the USA market is Virgin Atlantic. Airlines serving the Asian market include Air Blue, Emirates, Etihad Airways, Pakistan International Airlines, Qatar Airways and Singapore Airlines.

www.manchesterairport.co.uk

Manchester Airport

Why Cumbria

Liverpool John Lennon Airport

Until 2007 it was one of Europe's fastest growing airports, having increased its annual passenger numbers from 875,000 in 1998 to 5.47 million.

CAA UK airport statistics show that the number of passengers during 2009 reduced by 8.4% compared with 2008, to 4.9 million, making Liverpool the tenth busiest airport in the United Kingdom. However, CAA stats released 23rd July 2010 for the 1st half of 2010 show a 5.45% increase over the 1st half of 2009.

www.liverpoolairport.com

Liverpool Airport

Why Cumbria

Carlisle Airport

Carlisle Airport is at present primarily a hub for freight and private flights. Plans to develop the site have been ongoing since it was acquired by Stobart Group in 2009. The company aims to relocate the group headquarters to the airport site and bring the airport back to a standard that will enable commercial passenger flights to recommence. This included the re-surfacing of the existing runway to accept larger aircraft as part of a £21 million development. Ryanair also expressed an interest in using the completed airport as a hub.

www.carlisleairport.co.uk

Carlisle Airport

Why Cumbria

Leeds Bradford International Airport

Work on the airport terminal has been ongoing since 1996, and the result of this has been significant growth in terminal size and passenger facilities. In 2007 nearly 2.9 million passengers passed through the airport, an 88% increase in just seven years and more than twice as many compared with 1997 (1.2 million).

Much of the growth in passenger numbers since 2003 has been due to the introduction of scheduled flights by the based low-cost airline Jet2.com.

www.leedsbradfordairport.co.uk

Leeds Bradford Airport

Ports

Overview

Cumbria has a high density of ports along its coast line providing access to worldwide trade routes

The Port of Workington is the largest port on Cumbria, handling 600,000 tonnes of cargo and around 300 ship movements each year. Owned and operated by Cumbria County Council, the port has secured £5.7m to establish a major container handling facility.

Port of Barrow has considerable experience in handling specialist cargoes as well as a range of bulk aggregates. It is owned and operated by Associated British Ports, who also own the Port of Silloth, which specialises in argribulks such as animal feed.

Smaller ports can be found at Maryport and Whitehaven, focused mainly on serving the fishing and leisure and tourism sectors, while the Port of Millom is currently advancing plans to extend the services it provides to the business, leisure, tourism, energy and environment sectors.

Please use the map icons to find out more on each of the ports in Cumbria.

 

Ports

Port of Heysham

Heysham Port is the 24 HOUR gateway offering easy round-the-clock access for Irish Sea ferries, a diverse range of general cargo services and the response-time sensitive offshore gas supply industry.

Heysham Port

Ports

Port of Barrow

Centrally located on the West Coast of the UK, Barrow has worldwide trading links. The port has considerable experience in handling specialist cargoes as well as a range of bulk aggregates. It is also an ideal base for offshore and renewable-energy projects located in the Irish Sea, and has become the import hub for Kimberly Clark's woodpulp products.

Barrow is known as the 'Gateway to the Lake District', and is a welcoming port of call for 'round-Britain' cruises.

www.abports.co.uk/custinfo/ports/barrow.htm

Port of Barrow

Ports

Whitehaven Marina

Whitehaven Marina is the most comprehensive marina on the north west coast of England; a safe harbour with 285 fully serviced marina berths and extensive quay wall berth areas for larger boats.

Access to the marina is available at almost all states of the tide and the boatyard services include boat lifting, hard standing and under cover boat storage.

whitehavenmarina.co.uk

Whitehaven Harbour

Ports

Port of Workington

The Port of Workington is the largest port in Cumbria and one of the main hubs in the North West. It serves the region's industry and agriculture, including most of the major manufacturing and processing businesses in the area.

Workington handles 600,000 tonnes of cargo and around 300 ship movements each year. The port has room for expansion and has been diversifying into new operations since the emergence of the Britain's Energy Coast initiative. It recently secured £5.7m to establish a major container handling facility, which will significantly improve links to international markets.

www.portofworkington.co.uk

Port of Workington

Ports

Maryport Harbour

Maryport harbour was developed around a fishing creek at the mouth of the River Ellen in the nineteenth century. The harbour prospered mainly due to the export of coal to Ireland, and exports of steel rails, bar bolts and cast iron from the Solway Iron Works. Shipbuilders' yards were also a common sight around Maryport. In recent years the business of the port has focused on serving the local fishing industry and on a growing leisure and tourism market, helped by significant investment to improve the marina.

www.maryportharbour.com

Maryport Harbour

Ports

Port of Silloth

The Port of Silloth has seen steady growth in tonnage levels over recent years. Located on the English side of the Solway Firth, many of the port's customers trade with Western Europe. Silloth's principal trade is agribulks and the port is the North-West base for the operations of Prime Molasses – a major UK supplier of molasses to the animal-feed industry.

The port plays an integral role in the Cumbrian and regional economy and is a catalyst for local trade and commerce.

www.abports.co.uk/custinfo/ports/silloth.htm

Port of Silloth

Ports

Port of Millom

On the fringe of the Lake District National Park, Port Millom offers a direct gateway to the stunning western and southern lakes and fells, as well as the Irish Sea coast and the Isle of Man.

Privately-owned and in operation for many years, the port currently focuses on serving the transport, storage, tourism and energy sectors. It also provides a number of marine services to commerce and industry in the Northwest of England.

www.portmillom.co.uk

Port of Haverigg